Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Emergency Transboundary Outbreak Pest (ETOP) situation bulletin for June with a forecast through mid-August 2022.

Abstract

This bulletin focuses on the desert locust (Schistoseca gregaria; SGR) situation, which remained calm in the Central Ourt Outbreak Region (COR) during June. Only a few adults were detected in the River Nile region in Sudan, and some adults persisted in southeast Egypt during this month. In the Western outbreak region (WOR), a few adults were detected in central and southern Sahara of Algeria. No locusts were reported in the Eastern outbreak region (EOR). The red (nomadic) locust (Nomadacris septemfasciata; NSE) developed with immature adults appearing in the primary outbreak areas in Malawi, Mozambique, Tanzania and Zambia. The African migratory locust (Locusta migratoria migratorioides; AML) had isolated to scattered populations in Simalaha Plains, Zambia. In Madagascar, aerial and ground survey and control operations continued against Malagasy locust (Locusta migratoria capito; LMC) and NSE. The Central American locust, Schistocerca piceiferons (CAL) remained calm in Central America and only a few solitary hoppers and transient populations were detected in Mexico and Guatemala, respectively. No updates were received for the Italian (CIT), Moroccan (DMA) and Asian migratory locusts (LMI), but DMA is expected to have continued developing in Central Asian and neighboring countries. Fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) infestations continued affecting maize and other cereal crops in Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi and Tanzania, where control operations were launched by the affected farmers with assistance from their respective line Ministries. African armyworm (Spodoptera exempta) outbreaks were reported in Ethiopia and Kenya and control operations were carried out by the affected farmers with assistance from the MoAs. Quelea spp. outbreaks were reported in Ethiopia, Kenya Tanzania, Uganda and Zimbabwe where the pest was causing damage to pearl millet, rice, sorghum and/or wheat. Aerial operations were launched by DLCO-EA in all countries in collaboration with the respective MoAs. Active surveillance, monitoring and timely preventive and curative control as well as timely sharing of information on ETPs remain critical to abate the threats ETOPs pose to food security and livelihoods of vulnerable communities.