Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Responses of soil microbiota to different control methods of the Spartina alterniflora in the Yellow River delta.

Abstract

Spartina alterniflora invasion has negative effects on the structure and functioning of coastal wetland ecosystems. Therefore, many methods for controlling S. alterniflora invasion have been developed. S. alterniflora control methods can affect plant community, which results in changes in microbial communities and subsequent changes in soil ecological processes. However, the effects of controlling S. alterniflora on soil microbial communities remain poorly understood. We aimed to examine the responses of bacterial and fungal communities to invasion control methods (cutting plus tilling treatment: CT; mechanical rolling treatment: MR). Soil bacterial and fungal community diversity and composition structure were assessed using high-throughput sequencing technology. The findings of the study showed that bacterial diversity and richness in the CT treatment reduced substantially, but fungal diversity and richness did not show any remarkable change. Bacterial and fungal diversity and richness in the MR treatment were not affected considerably. In addition, the two control methods significantly changed the soil microbial community structure. The relative abundance of bacteria negatively associated with nutrient cycling increased considerably in the CT treatment. The considerable increases in the relative abundance of certain bacterial taxa in the MR treatment may promote soil nutrient cycling. Compared with mechanical rolling, soil bacterial community diversity and structure were more sensitive to cutting plus tilling.