Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Variation of some morphological characteristics of Raphanus raphanistrum L. weed from wheat cultivated in ecological- green system.

Abstract

Lately, wild radish has been noted for its increased adaptability to various ecological conditions (Warwick & Francis, 2005), thus being considered an invasive weed (CABI, 2016). Usually, the plant follows the winter wheat in the vegetation (Cheam & Code, 1995; Cousens et al., 2001), although there has been an evolution of weeding in spring crops (Boström et al., 2003), such as sunflower. An explanation would also be due to the appearance of a certain degree of resistance to current herbicides (Brouillet et al., 2016). In organically grown wheat, the plant has undergone a new adaptation, less researched lately. Thus, the average height of the plants was 24 cm. Such a plant had 5 branches each, weighed 1.35 g and formed 18 siliceous weighing 0.9 g. The total number of siliceous grain segments on a plant was 64, with a total biomass of 0.8 g. The dimensions of the barrel-type silica segments were 4.7 mm long / 3.4 mm thick. The mass of one thousand grain segments (MTGS) was 13 g. Simple correlations were established between all these characters. Significantly positive links were obtained between the morphological and biomass characteristics of the plant. Instead, negative correlations were found between the size of the fruit fragments and the other determinations of the plants. On the other hand, the mass of one thousand segments with grains was negatively correlated with the number of branches (-.036), with the number of siliceous (-.160) and with the number of grains (-.205 *). The explanation consists in the fact that through the studied morphological characters, the weed demonstrated an increased adaptability in the culture of ecological wheat-green autumn wheat.