Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Prevalence and predation potential of rove beetle Paederus fuscipes Curtis (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae) on invasive fall armyworm Spodoptera frugiperda in fodder maize.

Abstract

Invasive fall armyworm (FAW), Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) is emerged as serious threat to maize cultivation in India. Rove beetle, Paederus fuscipes Curtis (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae) are a generalist predator found predating on various stages of FAW. Field incidence of adult rove beetle started during the 40 standard meteorological week and reached its peak population of 6.83/m2 during the 46 standard meteorological week. Within the season, the predatory adult beetle population was found significantly higher at reproductive phase (0.07 to 6.83/m2) than at vegetative phase (0.37 to 3.20/ m2). There was a significant difference on the feeding potential of adult rove beetle against various stages of fall armyworm. Adult P. fuscipes consumed an average of 32.3 eggs, 35.6 first instar larvae and 24.4 second instar larvae of FAW per day. Adult predator fed more on first instar FAW larvae compared to eggs and second instar larvae. This is the first report of feeding potential of adult P. fuscipes on FAW. This study highlighted the role of native generalist predator P. fuscipes in managing invasive FAW. Therefore, conservation of P. fuscipes could be encouraged through use of safer insecticides.