Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Non-proteinaceous salivary compounds of a predatory bug cause histopathological and cytotoxic effects in prey.

Abstract

N,N-dimethylaniline and 1,2,5-trithiepane, present in the salivary glands of Podisus nigrispinus Dallas (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae), are toxic compounds which kill prey. The insecticidal activity and midgut cytotoxicity in Spodoptera frugiperda J. E. Smith (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) caterpillars fed on a diet with lethal concentrations of N,N-dimethylaniline and 1,2,5-trithiepane were evaluated. Midgut cell damage was evaluated with both light and transmission electron microscopy. The LC50 and LC90 of N,N-dimethylaniline were 0.611 and 0.818 μg L-1, respectively, and for 1,2,5-trithiepane they were 0.671 and 0.885 μg L-1, respectively. Vacuolization in the digestive and goblet cells occurred after 1 h of exposure in the midgut of the insects treated with either N,N-dimethylaniline and 1,2,5-trithiepane. Changes caused by N,N-dimethylaniline and 1,2,5-trithiepane in the midgut of S. frugiperda caterpillars may affect digestion and nutrient absorption with negative impacts on the insect's development and survival. The non-proteinaceous N,N-dimethylaniline and 1,2,5-trithiepane compounds have insecticidal effects, confirming the potential use on S. frugiperda caterpillars through oral administration.