Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Ethno-phytotechnology of Tribulus terrestris L. (Zygophyllaceae).

Abstract

ETHNO-PHYTOTECHNOLOGY combines ethnobotany and biotechnology. This study evaluated the ethnobotanical role, anticancer potential, and allelopathy of Tribulus terrestris L. The ethnobotanical survey of twenty informants used an open-ended questionnaire. T. terrestris contains steroids, saponins, antioxidants, flavonoids, alkaloids, phenolics, proteins, and amino acids. The study investigated cytotoxic effects using six carcinoma cell lines. Hordeum vulgare and Lepidium sativum were used as recipient species in the allelopathy experiments. We found that 95% of the informants stated that T. terrestris is an aggressive species that injures livestock, reduces biodiversity, leads to soil dryness, consumes large amounts of space during the vegetative season, and affects soil pH and the absorption of minerals. Ethanolic extracts produced a significant effect on the prostate (PC3), breast (MCF 7), lung (A549), and liver (HEP-G2) carcinoma cell lines, with IC50 values of 19, 22, 33, and 33μg/mL, respectively. The intestinal carcinoma cell line (CAco2) had an IC50 60μg/mL. The colon (HCT) carcinoma cell line had an IC50 value of 68 μg/mL. Water extracts inhibited the seed germination, plumule length, radicle growth, and fresh and dry matter production of the recipient species. This study demonstrated that T. terrestris is potentially valuable as an anticancer agent and an herbicide against harmful weeds.