Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotypes isolated for the first time in feral cats: the impact on public health.

Abstract

Stray cat populations can represent a significant threat of the transmission of zoonotic diseases such as salmonellosis. The objective of this study was to assess Salmonella carriage by free-living cats in Gran Canaria island and the Salmonella serovars involved, in order to inform to those responsible for the colonies about the possible risk factors. One hundred rectal swabs of feral cats were taken. Salmonella strains were serotyped in accordance with Kauffman-White-Le-Minor technique. Of a total of 100 animals under study, 19% were found to be positive to Salmonella spp. This is the first report that described the zoonotic serovars S. Nima, S. Bredeney, S. Grancanaria and S. Kottbus in cats. The present study demonstrates that feral cats may represent a source of risk for the spread of different Salmonella zoonotic serovars. It has been reported that there is a certain correlation between Salmonella isolates from pets and wild animals. Further studies are needed from other animal species and environmental sources to make this correlation.