Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Growth and ecological characteristics of Physalis angulata invasive weed species in several invaded communities.

Abstract

Physalis angulata L. (Solanaceae) an invasive alien weed displayed a great spreading and invasion in Egypt, thus the growth traits and functional strategies within the invaded lads and crops were analyzed. Seedling, juvenile, flowering, fruiting, and dispersion stages were distinguished with a short time and life cycle with an average from 70 to 90 days during the year. Specific leaf area was gradually increased until the final stage and vice versa in root mass and stem mass fractions. The accumulation coefficient of dry weight was increased significantly (P > 0.001) and ranged from 0.844 to 0.99 in response to the habitat conditions. The higher plasticity of P. angulata referred to the substantial adaptability to variable environmental conditions and to invade a new community. The demographic surveys of 60 invaded fields were found about 28 weed species within 25 genera in 10 families in examined crops. Physalis angulata have a high relative growth rate, massive fruits and subsequently seeds production, as well as a higher coefficient of similarity in the recipient communities. While their interaction with the native community was reflexed in their low richness, diversity, and evenness. The most susceptible crop to P. angulate invasion was Citrullus lanatus var. Colocynthoide followed by Sesamum indicum and in contrast Zea mays and Solanum melongena crops that can be considered as competitive crops to this weed. Finally, this information is important for the prediction of P. angulate impacts and future behavior.