Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Effect of duration of deployment on parasitism and predation of Halyomorpha halys (Stål) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) sentinel egg masses in various host plants.

Abstract

The invasive brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys (Stål) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae), is an agricultural and nuisance pest in Georgia and Alabama, USA. Natural enemies may provide significant suppression of the brown marmorated stink bug, and sentinel egg masses are deployed commonly on plants in the field to measure their effects. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of deployment duration (2-5 d) on parasitism and predation of brown marmorated stink bug sentinel egg masses in plum, peach, blueberry, tomato, sassafras, corn, and soybean in these 2 states. Retrieved egg masses were processed to quantify rates of predation and parasitism and identify parasitoid species and predation types. Across crops, predation and parasitism were higher significantly in plum at 5 d compared to 2 d deployment but was similar in soybean regardless of exposure time in 2017. Predation and parasitism were higher significantly after 5 d of exposure compared to 2 d and 3 d whereas parasitism was significantly higher at 3 d compared to 2 d exposure in 2018 to 2020. For individual crop trials, though, effects of time of exposure were tested in different yr, sampling dates, and crops with variable results. When significant differences were detected for parasitism in plum, peach, tomato, and sassafras, a 5 d deployment resulted in higher parasitism compared to 2 d. Given the variability of factors that affect parasitism and predation under field conditions, we conclude that a 5 d deployment is optimal and a 3 d exposure time is minimal for assessing predation and parasitism. An additional benefit for a 5 d exposure is that it increases the probability of detecting hyperparasitism.