Invasive Species Compendium

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Abstract

Composition and diversity of gut microbiota in Pomacea canaliculata in sexes and between developmental stages.

Abstract

Background The apple snail, Pomacea canaliculata, is one of the world's 100 worst invasive alien species and vector of some pathogens relevant to human health. Methods On account of the importance of gut microbiota to the host animals, we compared the communities of the intestinal microbiota from P. canaliculata collected at different developmental stages (juvenile and adult) and different sexes by using high-throughput sequencing. Results The core bacteria phyla of P. canaliculata gut microbiota included Tenericutes (at an average relative abundance of 45.7%), Firmicutes (27.85%), Proteobacteria (11.86%), Actinobacteria (4.45%), and Cyanobacteria (3.61%). The female group possessed the highest richness values, whereas the male group possessed the lowest bacterial richness and diversity compared with the female and juvenile group. Both the developmental stages and sexes had important effects on the composition of the intestinal microbiota of P. canaliculata. By LEfSe analysis, microbes from the phyla Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria were enriched in the female group, phylum Bacteroidetes was enriched in the male group, family Mycoplasmataceae and genus Leuconostoc were enriched in the juvenile group. PICRUSt analysis predicted twenty-four metabolic functions in all samples, including general function prediction, amino acid transport and metabolism, transcription, replication, recombination and repair, carbohydrate transport and metabolism, etc. Conclusions This study provided a general understanding of the diversity characteristics of intestinal microbial communities of P. canaliculata, and indicated that developmental stage and gender could both influence the intestinal microbes of P. canaliculata. Further study may focus on the interaction between the gut microbiota and their host.