Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Urban forestry in the south area of Rio de Janeiro: the society, the species and the damage to urban infrastructure.

Abstract

The objective of this study is to inventory the tree species in the urban forestry of Humaitá district, which is an urban-planning model in the city of Rio de Janeiro. We aim to evaluate the phytosanitary status of each tree, potential popular uses and damages caused by trees to the infrastructure. Data collection was based on inventoring the trees on streets and squares of the neighborhood. Trees were identified and classified based on plant health, spinning damage, pavement damage, origin of the species and social use. In total, we sampled 1,203 individuals belonging to 88 species and 32 families. The most abundant species were Pachira aquatica and Terminalia catappa. Fabaceae and Arecaceae were the most commonly cultivated plant families. In total, 67% of the recorded species and 83% of the individuals registered were exotic. Licania tomentosa was the most damaging species to electric wires. Licania tomentosa and Ficus benjamina were the most damaging species to pavement. We conclude that few trees species are damaging the infrastructure. From a biodiversity perspective, there are too many exotic species and a lack of native species, as urban afforestation has strong impact on natural ecosystems of the City.