Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

A systematic review of terrestrial plant invasion mechanisms mediated by microbes and restoration implications.

Abstract

Terrestrial invasive plant species continue to wreak havoc on a global economic and ecological scale. With the advent of climate change and pending future catastrophes, the spread of resilient invasive plants will only increase exponentially. Here, the search continues for a better understanding of the below-ground microbially driven mechanisms involved in plant invasion where other above-ground mechanisms have been exhausted. Microbes govern the world around us and interact with every living and non-living facet of the world. To reinforce the important underpinnings of the role of microorganisms in plant invasion, a systematic review of recently published articles was undertaken. Using the ScienceDirect database, five (5) search queries were used to generate 1221 research articles. After a two-step reduction was made based on relevance of the articles, a final total of 59 articles were retrieved. An additional 18 relevant articles were also assessed through the PubMed database for analysis to account for other invasive plants. Thirty-seven (37) invasive species were investigated where soil physiochemical and microbial community structure changes were most prevalent (32% & 39% respectively) while enhanced mutualism, allelopathy and pathogen accumulation were reported less (16%, 10% & 3% respectively). In all invasive species assessed, the impact on plant invasion and inability of the native plants to compete was due to specific microbial associations of the invasive plant or disruption of the soil microbial community. This microbial community shift coincided with changes in physiochemical properties of the soil and the subsequent negative soil feedback for native plants. There is still an expanding potential for the use of biocontrol agents to aid restoration once the underpinnings of biotic resistance and enemy release are understood in a microbial and physiochemical context. The active and functional microbial community structure of the invasive plant rhizosphere and adjacent soil in its native and non-native region can offer a better inference of how they can be controlled using novel-below ground biocontrol methods.