Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Emergency Transboundary Outbreak Pest (ETOP) situation bulletin for February with a forecast through mid-April 2022.

Abstract

The Desert Locust (Schistoseca gregaria - SGR1): The locust situation remained calm in the Horn of Africa, in Somalia, Ethiopia and Djibouti in the Central outbreak regions (COR). Only some hopper and adult groups were treated (1,220 ha) in southeast Egypt, and scattered adults were observed on the Red Sea coast in Sudan and isolated adults were detected on the Oman coast. No locusts were reported elsewhere in the region. The western outbreak region (WOR) remained calm, and only some adults were observed in southern Algeria. No locusts were reported in the eastern outbreak region (EOR) during this month. Forecast: Ecological conditions will continue drying out in Egypt, Sudan, Eritrea, Saudi Arabia, and Yemen along both sides of the Red Sea coasts causing locust numbers to further decline in COR. Only low numbers of adults may appear in spring breeding areas in the interior of Saudi Arabia and Yemen, but poor rains are expected to limit breeding during the forecast period. In WOR, small-scale breeding may commence in Algeria and Morocco as the temperature rises and seasonal rains begin falling, however, significant development is unlikely in the region during the forecast period. In EOR, isolated adults are likely to appear in southeast Iran and southwest Pakistan and start breeding on a small-scale, but significant development is no likely during the forecast period. Red (Nomadic) Locust (Nomadacris septemfasciata) (NSE): NSE situation remained relatively calm during February. The development of hopper bands and fledglings was expected in the primary outbreak areas in Tanzania, Malawi, Mozambique, and Zambia in the International Red Locust Control Organization in the Southern and Central Africa (IRLCO-CSA) region. African Migratory Locust (Locusta migratoria migratorioides) (AML): Isolated populations of AML persisted in Simalaha Plains in Western Province in Zambia and Manicaland, Zimbabwe. Malagasy locust (Locust migratoria capito) (ML): In Madagascar, aerial and ground survey and control operations continued against hopper groups and bands and young adults with the support of two FAO contracted helicopters. Tree Locusts, Anacridium spp. (ASP): No ASP activities were reported during this month. Central American Locust, Schistocerca piceiferons (CAL): CAL outbreak was reported in agricultural fields in La Cáscara, Nuevo León, Mexico during February. South American Locust, Schistocerca cancellata (SAL): No update was received at the time this bulletin was compiled. Italian (CIT), Moroccan (DMA), and Asian Migratory Locusts (LMI): DMA, CIT and LMI activities remined calm in the CCA regions. Fall Armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda, J. E. Smith) (FAW): FAW infestations continued in Zambia, Malawi, and Zimbabwe where control operations were carried out by the affected farmers with material and technical assistance from their respective Ministries of Agriculture (MoA). FAW infestations are expected to have occurred elsewhere in SSA and other countries, but updates were not available at the time this bulletin was compiled. African Armyworm (Spodoptera exempta) (AAW): AAW outbreaks were reported in Tanzania, Malawi, and Kenya; affected farmers carried out control operations with material and technical assistance from their respective MoAs. Quelea species (QSP): QSP outbreaks were reported in Ethiopia, Tanzania, and Zimbabwe where the pest was threatening/damaging rice, sorghum and wheat. Active surveillance, monitoring and timely preventive and curative control as well as timely sharing of information on ETPs remain critical to abate the threats ETOPs pose to food security and livelihoods of vulnerable communities. USAID/BHA/TPQ regularly monitors ETOPs in close collaboration with its global network of PPDs/DPVs, regional and international pest monitoring and control entities, FAO, CLCPRO, CRC, DLCO-EA, and IRLCO-CSA, and research centers, academia, private sector, NGOs and others and issues monthly analytical ETOP Bulletins to stakeholders (refer to list of acronyms from pages 13 on).