Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Evaluation of allelopathic stress of Cyperus esculentus remains on some invasive weeds.

Abstract

Due to the plant production of biological active compounds, allelopathy is formed from plants or their remnants. This has some effects on germination, growth and development of the same species or other species. For this purpose, an experiment was conducted to evaluate the allelopathic stress of different amounts of Cyperus esculentus weed remains (0, 12, 24, 36 and 48 g per 3 Kg loamy soil) on germination and morphophysiological characteristics of aggressive weeds of Ipomoea tricolor and Cucumis melo. This experiment was done in the form of two seprated experiments in a completely randomized design with five treatments and three replications in the pot condition. Findings showed that the intensity of allelopathic effects of C. esculentus on two weeds of I. tricolor and C. melo was decrasing and significant based on the amount of residue of C. esculentus in the soil. So that traits such as rate and germination percentage, leaf area, fresh and dry weight of root, stem, leaf and also the content of chlorophyll a, b, total and carotenoids in I. tricolor more affected under allelopathic compounds of different plant residues of C. esculentus as compared to control. Studing the trend of changes in proline content and catalase activity in I. tricolor and C. melo also indicates some characteristics such as increasing values of C. esculentus remnants. Lower photosynthetic pigments and more severe reduction of germination and growth traits in I. tricolor as compared to C. melo can be testify to the greater sensitivity of these species in the presence of allelopathic substances of C. esculentus. Due to the high biomass on farms, its proved allelopathic effect C. esculentus can be a candidate for the production of biological derived herbicides.