Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Effects of elevated temperature on root system development of two lupine species.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to assess the effect of elevated temperature on the growth, morphology and spatial orientation of lupine roots at the initial stages of development and on the formation of lupine root architecture at later stages. Two lupine species were studied-the invasive Lupinus polyphyllus Lindl. and the non-invasive L. luteus L. The plants were grown in climate chambers under 25°C and simulated warming at 30°C conditions. The angle of root curvature towards the vector of gravity was measured at the 48th hour of growth, and during a 4-h period after 90° reorientation. Root biometrical, histological measurements were carried out on 7-day-old and 30-day-old plants. The elevation of 5°C affected root formation of the two lupine species differently. The initial roots of L. polyphyllus were characterized by worse spatial orientation, reduced growth and reduced mitotic index of root apical meristem at 30°C compared with 25°C. The length of primary roots of 30-day-old lupines and the number of lateral roots decreased by 14% and 16%, respectively. More intense root development and formation were observed in non-invasive L. luteus at 30°C. Our results provide important information on the effect of elevated temperature on the formation of root architecture in two lupine species and suggest that global warming may impact the invasiveness of these species.