Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

The attractiveness of α-copaene to members of the Euwallacea fornicatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) species complex in California and Taiwan.

Abstract

Species belonging to the Euwallacea fornicatus Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Scolytinae) species complex have invaded the continental U.S. since at least 2003. Three species of this complex are known to have established, two in California (E. fornicatus; and Euwallacea kuroshio), and a third in Florida (Euwallacea perbrevis). Their native ranges are spread across southern and southeast Asia. In Taiwan, all three species occur in sympatry. They attack healthy trees of widely varied species and cause severe damage and death to the trees. The attractant quercivorol is commonly used to promote their detection by passive trapping. Recent studies in Florida have shown that trapping of E. perbrevis can be further improved by adding a synergist, α-copaene, alongside the quercivorol lure. Thus, we were interested in testing the effectiveness of α-copaene for trapping the other invasive members of the complex in California and in an area of Taiwan where all three species co-occur. We found that α-copaene marginally enhanced the trapping of E. perbrevis in Taiwan, but had no effect on the trapping of E. fornicatus or E. kuroshio in either California or Taiwan. We conclude that any enhancing effect of α-copaene is specific to E. perbrevis. This highlights the economic importance of accurate species identification in developing and implementing an efficient, and yet cost-effective, monitoring program for the management of E. fornicatus and E. kuroshio in California and elsewhere.