Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Utilizing urban arboreta for detection of native and non-native wood-inhabiting beetles.

Abstract

We developed a multi-year insect emergence survey for the monitoring and detection of invasive non-native species at two urban arboreta in Boston, Massachusetts and New York City, New York. Arborists pruned and sequestered pieces of these trees for up to 2 years inside emergence containers. Host material was sampled from 117 trees comprising 67 species from the two sites. From these samples, 15 370 beetles were identified from all families, including 246 buprestids (21 species), 822 cerambycids (29 species) and 8825 scolytines (46 species). Individual emergence chambers employed two collection methods: phototaxis toward an attached collection cup and sweeping barrel contents following the sequestration period. Sweeping resulted in many species not collected from cups. We documented 17 new state records for Massachusetts and New York and 143 new host associations for buprestids, cerambycids and scolytines, including 22 new host associations of non-native beetles on native host trees and 51 new host associations of native beetles on non-native hosts. One buprestid species, not native to North America yet new to science, Agrilus sp. 9895, was discovered. The combination of new state records, new host associations and new species detections illustrates how this survey method can be effective and beneficial for detection purposes.