Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Effects of chlorantraniliprole and chromafenozide on mortality and feeding cessation of the fall webworm, Hyphantria cunea (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae).

Abstract

The fall webworm (FWW) Hyphantria cunea, native to North America, is a globally invasive pest of a wide range of forest and fruit trees. Spraying of pesticides is the primary method for the control of FWW. In this study, toxicity and feeding cessation of two potential pesticides against the FWW, chlorantraniliprole, and chromafenozide, were evaluated. Both pesticides were slow to affect FWW. For chlorantraniliprole, the highest mortality of third instar larvae occurred at 72 h with an LC50 of 10.34 mg/L, while for chromafenozide, the highest mortality occurred at 72 h with an LC50 value 74.0950 mg/L. Low concentrations of both pesticides led to larvae ceasing to feed after six hours (chlorantraniliprole) and 24 h (chromafenozide). Both pesticides had persistent effects; thirty days after being applied at concentrations of 16, 26.67, and 35.56 mg/L to leaves, 93.33% of newly contacted larvae died after seven days. Our study showed that chlorantraniliprole and chromafenozide could be alternatively used against FWW and form a component of integrated control programs. The results provide information to guide the usage of chlorantraniliprole and chromafenozide in FWW control.