Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Rapid and strong population genetic differentiation and genomic signatures of climatic adaptation in an invasive mealybug.

Abstract

Aim: A growing number of studies suggest that adaptation of invasive species plays key roles in their successful establishment in novel environments. However, adaptation of invasive species to climatic conditions remains poorly characterized. This study aimed to understand the population genetic structure produced by the cotton mealybug Phenacoccus solenopsis invasion and to identify preliminary signals of selection during its range expansion. Location: China. Methods: We examined genetic structure of 11 populations across China using SNPs, microsatellites and a segment of mitochondrial cox1 gene. ADMIXTURE, STRUCTURE and DAPC were used to infer population genetic structure; the dispersal routes were reconstructed by the DIYABC; SNPs potentially related to climate adaptation were identified by using four populations differentiation methods and three environmental association methods. Results: Strong genetic differentiation was found among populations with FST values ranging from 0.097 to 0.640 based on SNPs. Populations located at the northern expansion edge exhibited the highest genetic differentiation and the lowest genetic diversity. Demographic analyses indicated that all populations were introduced from a single source population with small effective size and low recent gene flow. RDA analysis showed that climatic variables explained a higher proportion of genetic variance (43%) compared to population structure variables (15%). The top climatic variables associated with genetic differentiation were precipitation of the mean temperature of warmest quarter, mean temperature of driest quarter and isothermality. Genes related to climate candidate SNPs were mainly enriched to pathways of development, energy and xenobiotic metabolisms. Main conclusions: We found that extremely rapid and strong population genetic differentiation among populations appears to have developed after introduction in the cotton mealybug. Our study points to rapid neutral evolution and suggests possible climatic adaptation despite low genetic diversity in this invasive species.