Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Comparison of two methods for identifying alien genotypes in clonal seed orchards and consequences of misidentification.

Abstract

Genetic gains in forestry are often implemented by producing improved forest seeds in seed orchards. However, unwanted alien genotypes are often accidentally introduced into seed orchards, or genotypes are planted in incorrect locations, both of which can reduce genetic gains. Such errors can be detected using markers, mainly isoenzymatic proteins and microsatellite DNA. These markers differ in their sensitivity, meaning that they can yield different assessments of seed orchard genetic material even when plant material is identical. The main objective of this paper was to compare these two verification methods and their consequences for genetic improvement. Two uneven-aged Scots pine clonal seed orchards were analyzed using sets of isoenzymatic and microsatellite loci identified in other studies. The statistical analysis allowed comparison of the actual architecture of seed orchards to the planned layout. The number of clones was also compared to the effective number of clones.