Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Effects of invasive Rhus typhina L. on bacterial diversity and community composition in soil.

Abstract

L., an exotic plant that is widely distributed in China, is harmful to native ecosystems; however, little is known about its effects on soil microbial communities. Therefore, we investigated the effects of R. typhina on soil bacterial communities by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and compared the effects of R. typhina and native (Rhus chinensis Mill.) and non-invasive exotic species (Amorpha fruticosa L. and Robinia pseudoacacia L.) on soil bacterial communities via a greenhouse experiment. R. typhina decreased the diversity of the soil bacterial community compared with R. chinensis, and A. fruticosa. R. typhina soil was characterized by more Actinobacteria and lesser Proteobacteria and Acidobacteria than the other soils. Among Actinobacteria members, there was a difference in the relative abundance of Nocardioides and Streptomyces, and this could be advantageous for the growth of R. typhina. However, there was no significant difference in the soil bacterial community structure associated with R. typhina and other species. Moreover, the concentrations of total carbon, potassium, and nitrate were found to be the major soil factors influencing the relative abundance of soil bacteria.