Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Downside in habitat restoration: predation of artificial nests by invasive rodents in Macaronesian Laurel forest.

Abstract

This study assessed black rat predation on artificial nests in relation to restoration undertaken in the Macaronesian laurel forest in São Miguel Island, Azores, evaluating three different points: nest predation rate; rodent relative abundance; and abundance of invertebrates, flowers and fruits. In general, artificial nest predation increased after habitat restoration, and significant differences were found on a successfully restored forest site between year 0 and year 10. Rodent capture rates were significantly higher one decade after habitat restoration, and there were significantly more flowers and fruits available in the area with a higher restoration success than in the area with less restoration success. The results show that habitat restoration leads to an increase of black rat relative abundance, which is consistent with the increasing of artificial nest predation, and with the higher abundance of vegetal food on the successfully restored forest site. It is important to study and analyze these complex interactions which can have an influence on the survival of target species to conserve.