Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Linkages of flow regime and micro-topography: prediction for non-native mangrove invasion under sea-level rise.

Abstract

Flow regime is a key driver of invasive aquatic organisms, and the invasiveness of mangrove species may be simultaneously attributed to plant traits and flowing hydrological conditions at the estuary scale. We focused on hydrological and topographic conditions for a non-native mangrove species, Sonneratia apetala, in Zhangjiang Estuary of Fujian, China. A hydrological model and a micro-topographic model were used to predict its dispersal and early establishment, and field surveys and simulated experiments were integrated to estimate its future dispersal patterns. The mesohaline mudflat with a salinity of 8 ~ 10 PSU at the mangrove seaward edge was the most likely colonization area for S. apetala under current conditions. The south-western region of the estuary with native mangroves was the most likely area for its colonization according to the unstructured-grid finite-volume community ocean model (FVCOM) in September, when the largest tidal currents within a year and the maximum fruit maturity period occur. Approximately 42% of the mudflats throughout the whole estuary may be available for seedling establishment under the future sea-level rise RCP 4.5 scenarios compared with 44% for current establishment; however, the RCP 8.5 scenarios would significantly decrease seedling establishment by 2100 due to serious tidal inundation according to the micro-topographical model.