Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Economic assessment and community management of Prosopis juliflora invasion in Sweimeh village, Jordan.

Abstract

Invasions by invasive alien species (IAS) are recognized as one of the largest threats to earth's ecosystem services and represent rapidly growing economic costs as they damage local ecosystems and force surrounding communities to divert resources towards IAS management and control. The study objectives were to assess the economic impacts of a Prosopis juliflora invasion in Jordan and gauge community preferences for management plans. The study was conducted in Sweimeh, Jordan Valley using a combination of focus groups and randomized interviews with 203 local households. Direct-use values for products derived from P. juliflora and direct costs owing to P. juliflora's presence have been calculated. A binary logistic regression model was then developed to predict the households' preferences between two policy responses: P. juliflora management or complete eradication. The results revealed the dualistic role of P. juliflora in household livelihoods: it was widely used for firewood, fodder, and charcoal offering benefits valued at JOD 2165 per household/year (JOD 1 = USD 0.71). At the same time, the invasion reduced household welfare by taking over arable lands and injuring humans and animals. Consequently, the income lost as a result of the invasion was estimated by JOD 1410.5 per household/year. As a result, two-thirds of respondents choose the option of P.juliflora invasion management. Only respondents' monthly income and perception of P. juliflora's impact on the prevention of soil erosion were significant predictors of respondents' preferences for the management plans. In conclusion, more coordinated responses between policy makers, institutions, and local communities are required to mitigate the negative impact of P. juliflora invasion.