Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Going off the deep end: using public outdoor swimming pools as a detection survey tool for invasive insects.

Abstract

In 2017, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency analyzed the contents of outdoor swimming pool filters in Essex County to determine if pools could be used to detect invasive insects. Insects from two orders and nine families were collected, with Scarabaeidae (Coleoptera) being the most numerous taxon. In addition to Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica Newman), we caught scooped scarab (Onthophagus hecate (Panzer)), European chafer (Amphimallon majale (Razoumowsky)), Asiatic garden beetle (Maladera castanea (Arrow)), northern masked chafer (Cyclocephala borealis Arrow) and southern masked chafer (C. lurida Bland) in the filters. Of these, M. castanea is a new record for Ontario, while C. borealis is a new Canadian record. In total, 74 scarab beetles were captured in the filters and all of them were in good condition to allow for morphological identification. These results show that examining the contents of pool filters shows promise as a detection tool for non-indigenous insects.