Invasive Species Compendium

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Abstract

Seasonal changes in fungi colonies inhabiting black cherry stumps.

Abstract

Black cherry is an important invasive species in forest ecosystems in Poland. It developed mainly in Scots pine stands. The aim of the study was to identify microscopic fungi colonies inhabiting black cherry stumps. In the spring of 2017, wood samples were collected from stumps created after cutting in each subsequent month of 2016 in the Podanin Forest District (19°2800 E, 52°0400 N). Stumps up to 5 cm and more than 5 cm in diameter were selected for the study. In total, 72 discs from the first stage of the decomposition of wood were collected. The discs were drilled to obtain fine sawdust for further analysis. The trials were divided into four periods. DNA isolation was performed using the Plant Genomic DNA purification kit (ThermoScientific). The ITS1/2 rDNA region was used for species identification. The analysis was carried out using specific primers. The obtained product was purified and sequenced using the Illumina SBS technology. The resulting sequence was compared using the BLAST algorithm with reference sequences from the NCBI database. The communities of fungi inhabiting the black cherry stumps differed from each other. The highest number of taxa was identified in samples from stumps over 5 cm sheared in autumn and winter, while the lowest in stumps up to 5 cm sheared in spring and winter. Fungi belonging to the Ascomycota and Basidiomycota, Blastocladiomycota, Glomeromycota, Zygomycota and non-cultivable fungi and organisms belonging to other kingdoms were identified. Saprophytes from Menispora sp. dominated on the analysed stumps. The collection of fungi of larger stumps was more diverse and more numerous than on stumps with a smaller diameter. A greater diversity of taxa was distinguished by the stumps of tree fallen in the growing season. The majority of the analyzed samples were dominated by Ascomycota. Basidiomycota clusters dominated in the winter. The predominant share of saprotrophs shows the distribution of stumps. The most desirable effect of the research would be the indication of naturally occurring saprotroph, whose operation would reduce the black cherry's yield strength. The applied method of sequencing based on the Illumina System was effective to determine the composition of the fungal population.