Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Compilation of surveys of medicinal plants used in Rio Grande do Sul.

Abstract

The appreciation and recording of traditional knowledge about medicinal plants is the aim of state and national public policies. In this sense, the Intersectoral Policy of Medicinal Plants and Herbal Medicines in Rio Grande do Sul - Brazil (RS) recommends, among other things, the stimulation of research on medicinal plants, giving priority to native species. Actually, there is a reduction in the occurrence of medicinal species leading to the loss of traditional knowledge due to the reduction of natural areas and the devaluation of traditional knowledge by the new generations, associated with an increasing access to conventional medicine. In this context, this study aimed to perform bibliographical and documentary research on the use of medicinal plants in RS state and to consolidate these studies in order to compose material for the compilation of a single list of the most commonly used plant species for medicinal purposes in the RS state. It was used a quanti-qualitative methodology with bibliographical research and document analysis, to survey the popular use of medicinal plants in the RS by consultation in ethnobotanical surveys; scientific books, annals and documents of forums and meetings achieved on medicinal plants; data provided by research centers and governmental organizations; libraries and university sites; articles in databases (Scielo and Lilacs); publications about medicinal plants used by popular, syndical, religious and assistance organizations, NGOs, traditional groups, etc. In the next step it was investigated the citation of the species used in different cities in the RS, in order to seek medicinal plants actually more used by the population from the collection and consolidation of lists of the plant species used. Data collection resulted in a list of more than 280 plant species distributed in more than 80 botanical families. It was found that of the 20 species most commonly used, less than 50% are native. From these results it can be seen the predominant use of exotic species, a fact closely related to the cultural diversity of the state. It was noted that of the 71 species most commonly used in the RS, 31 plants are present in RENISUS (National List of Medicinal Plants of Interest to SUS), 4 species are included in the RENAME (National List of Essential Medicines) and 42 medicinal plants are native. On the other hand, of the list of 40 native species most commonly used in the RS state, only 12 plants are in RENISUS and 2 medicinal plants are in RENAME. As a prospect to work it is to consolidate a list of medicinal plants more commonly used by the population of RS state in order to support a single list to be prioritized for research and incorporation, with safety and efficacy, on the SUS/RS, as well as to support the development of a State List of Essential Medicines and a State List of Medicinal Plants of RS.