Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

First records of the European wool carder bee, 'Anthidium manicatum' (Linnaeus, 1758) (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae: Anthidiini) in Australia.

Abstract

The first records of the European wool carder bee, 'Anthidium manicatum' (Linnaeus, 1758), in Gippsland, Victoria, Australia are reported. Reasons for the success of the bee family Megachilidae and success of the world's most widespread, unmanaged bee, 'A. manicatum', are discussed. The spread of 'A. manicatum' in the USA and New Zealand and the spread of the recently introduced African carder bee, 'Pseudoanthidium (Immanthidium) repetitum' (Schulz, 1906), in Australia are considered in relation to the potential spread of this new invasive bee in Australia. The only apparent limiting factor to the spread of 'A. manicatum' appears to be the availability of the plant family Lamiaceae, from which it cards or scrapes plant-fibres used for nesting material. The effect of this bee on the Australian native bee fauna and its potential to proliferate sleeper weeds in Australia are examined in relation to overseas observations. Exotic status terminology, ranging from adventive to invasive, is provided for the seven non-native bee species now found in Australia.