Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Preliminary study on invasive fish species diffusion in selected Malaysian freshwater ecosystems.

Abstract

Background and Objective: Malaysia reported experiencing serious invasive species intrusion in various rivers and threatening some local species to distinct. A study was undertaken to estimate and compare their composition and species richness in two pristine and two disturbed freshwater ecosystems. Materials and Methods: Invasive and local species growth pattern was also estimated using length-weight analysis. Sampling was conducted using cast net and electric shock in each river twice in 12 months. Fish collected were identified, photo captured and measured for their weight and length. The growth pattern was also estimated using length-weight analysis. Results: A total of 188 fishes were caught, comprises of 8 families and 15 species (ten local species with 119 individuals and five alien species with 69 individuals). Sistomus binotatus was the most dominant local species, whereas Tilapia nilotica was the most dominant alien species. There is no significant difference in composition between local and invasive species occur indicates the raise of alien species in those ecosystems even local species still dominated. The growth pattern for Sistomus binotatus and Clarias batrachus is isometric in the pristine ecosystem but negative isometric in disturbed rivers. Contrary, Tilapia nilotica has isometric for both ecosystems. Conclusion: This study concluded the capability and potential of colonization of alien species in stress ecosystem especially Tilapia nilotica. Thus, there is potential colonization of alien in Malaysia freshwater systems and a threat to local species due to food competition, site preferences and survival ability.