Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Occurrence and ecological data on an exotic solitary bee accidentally introduced in Brazil.

Abstract

Currently, there is a global concern regarding exotic species due to, among other factors, their great ability to reproduce and spread rapidly through the novel environment. As such, these species often compete for nesting places and food resources or convey pathogens. Anthidium manicatum (Linnaeus) (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae) is a non-native solitary bee occurring in Brazil. This study aimed to collect data about the occurrence sites of this species to investigate the historical sequence of its spread throughout the country. Based on this, we estimated population data such as the number of males and females, phenology and bioclimatic niche overlap with native species. The occurrence records were retrieved from speciesLink and Global Biodiversity Information Facility. All analyses were performed in R. The collected data demonstrate that, except for the 1960s, the records of the occurrence of A. manicatum in Brazil are few and constant, being notified since the mid-1930s in at least nine Brazilian states. In total, 778 individuals were sampled, with males being recorded about 1.7 times more than females. This species seems to be bivoltine, with generations in May and November. Anthidium manicatum showed a low and moderate bioclimatic niche overlap with two native species, Anthidium sertanicola Moure & Urban and Anthidium latum Schrottky, respectively. These data provide relevant information on the biology and status of A. manicatum in Brazil. However, since most Brazilian scientific collections have not digitalized their data in the platforms consulted here, some ecological features described here may be underestimated.