Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

A preliminary phylogenetic analysis of ribbed-pine-borer (Rhagium inquisitor) based on mitochondrial COI sequences.

Abstract

The increased volume of intercontinental-trade had facilitated the distribution of species, including invaders. Wooden packaging materials, goods and timber are being transported via international ports in East of the Marmara Basin, where has vast forests. That forests provide an appropriate-mediator for the introduction and invasion of wood-boring insects, which are the most common group being transported between continents. One of them is Rhagium inquisitor, which has a pivotal role in wood decay, nevertheless, it is detrimental for industrial wood. We analyzed the 654 bp length of cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) gene, to determine native and introduced haplotypes of the ribbed-pine-borer, to investigate their phylogenetic relationships and possibly cryptic speciation of the morphospecies. It was found out that sixteen haplotypes were divided into five haplogroups. The groups were assembled on two main lineages: Eurasian and American. The genetic distance between the American (Groups 1-3), Asian (Group-4) and European (Group-5) clusters ranged from 3 to 10%; between haplotypes ranged from 0.2 to 10.9%. The distances between the specimens of the Marmara Basin (H9-12, Group-4) were lower compared to H16, which nested in Group-5. That haplotype was sampled on imported timber and was found out that it is shared between France, Germany, Italy, and Austria. Maximum Likelihood, Neighbor-Joining and Bayesian Inference trees showed the same topologies, and Median-Joining network also supported them. Contrary to the usual, our findings point out that some species might have been introduced from Europe to Asia. Furthermore, the high genetic diversity of the bark-runner between continents could be a sign of cryptic-allopatric speciation.