Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Selective native plants of oklahoma and nearby states that can be a nuisance to occasionally invasive.

Abstract

Four ornamental species, lyreleaf salvia (Salvia lyrata), roughleaf dogwood (Cornus drummondii), northern sea oats (Chasmanthium latifolium), and cholla (Cylindropuntia imbricata), are all native to Oklahoma and nearby states. They all possess ornamental attributes and range from widespread to niche crops in the nursery industry and are also cultivated for their utilitarian, herbal, and miscellaneous merits. Their allure to customers and their ability to thrive in a myriad of environments is a major impetus for commercial growers and retailers to carry these species. However, their extraordinary ability to adapt to a plethora of environmental conditions, in the built environment or in their native range, also enables them to often outcompete neighboring flora. Their predisposition to be opportunistic, and ability to grow in challenging locations, sometimes results in their becoming a nuisance or even invasive (i.e., capable of displacing other native flora or fauna). Plants featured are described for their marketable attributes but also reviewed for control measures (e.g., herbicides, prescribed burning, improved grazing practices) when they grow in an aggressive manner.