Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Rainbow smelt population responses to species invasions and change in environmental condition.

Abstract

Invasive species can cause major disruptions in native food webs, yet the impact of species introductions and whether they will become invasive appears to be context-dependent. Rainbow smelt and alewife co-exist as invasive species in the Laurentian Great Lakes and as native species on the Atlantic coast of North America, but in Lake Champlain rainbow smelt is the dominant native forage fish and alewife are invasive. Alewife became abundant by 2007, providing an opportunity to explore the dynamics of these two species in a system where only one is invasive. We used data from a 28-year forage fish survey to compare demographics of rainbow smelt populations in three basins of Lake Champlain with different volumes, nutrient levels, and predator abundances. Rainbow smelt catch-per-unit-effort (CPUE) remained constant in the large, deep Main Lake before and after alewife invaded, but decreased in the two smaller basins. Declines were primarily a result of increased age-0 and age-1 mortality. Predation by top piscivores, system productivity, and competition for resources alone could not explain the patterns in CPUE across the basins. The mechanisms that allow alewife and rainbow smelt to co-exist could be related to system volume and oxythermal habitat availability, and may explain why the two species do not negatively affect each other in the Great Lakes. Summer hypoxia in the smaller basins could force individuals into smaller habitat volumes with higher densities of competitors and cannibalistic adult rainbow smelt. Habitat availability may mediate the impact of invasive alewife on native rainbow smelt.