Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Elevated temperature induced adaptive responses of two lupine species at early seedling phase.

Abstract

This study aimed to investigate the impact of climate warming on hormonal traits of invasive and non-invasive plants at the early developmental stage. Two different lupine species-invasive Lupinus polyphyllus Lindl. and non-invasive Lupinus luteus L.-were used in this study. Plants were grown in climate chambers under optimal (25°C) and simulated climate warming conditions (30°C). The content of phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), ethylene production and the adaptive growth of both species were studied in four-day-old seedlings. A higher content of total IAA, especially of IAA-amides and transportable IAA, as well as higher ethylene emission, was determined to be characteristic for invasive lupine both under optimal and simulated warming conditions. It should be noted that IAA-L-alanine was detected entirely in the invasive plants under both growth temperatures. Further, the ethylene emission values increased significantly in invasive lupine hypocotyls under 30°C. Invasive plants showed plasticity in their response by reducing growth in a timely manner and adapting to the rise in temperature. Based on the data of the current study, it can be suggested that the invasiveness of both species may be altered under climate warming conditions.