Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Description of changes of key performance indicators and PRRSV shedding over time in a naïve breeding herd following a PRRS MLV exposure.

Abstract

Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is an important economic swine disease. The usage of PRRS-modified live vaccines (MLV) is the predominant breeding herd immunologic solution used in the United States to minimize the economic losses associated with wild-type PRRS infection. Most of the current information on the effects of contemporary PRRS MLV vaccination on breeding herd performance under field conditions comes from herds with previous PRRS virus (PRRSV) exposure. Hence, there is little information on key performance indicators (KPI) changes after the exposure to a PRRS MLV in PRRSV-naïve breeding herds. The main objective of this longitudinal observational study was to describe selected KPI changes in a naïve breeding herd after PRRS MLV exposure. The secondary objective was to describe the pattern of detection of PRRSV RNA by the quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction in processing fluid samples. There were transient increases for mummies during weeks 4-23 (+0.86%); increased pre-weaning mortality on weeks 3-5 (+3.76%); a decrease in live born on weeks 4-5 (-0.46) leading to a decreased pig weaned/litter on weeks 5-10 (-0.69) and increased repeated services on weeks 3-23 (+5.53%). Transient changes observed after PRRS MLV exposures did not move total pigs weaned to outside the control intervals. Starting on week 83 and for 53 consecutive weeks, there was no PRRSV detection in processing fluids, even though two whole-herd MLV exposures occurred within that period.