Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Evaluating the life-history responses of adult invasive (Bithynia tentaculata) and native (Physa gyrina) snails exposed to a cu-based pesticide (earthtec® QZ).

Abstract

The faucet snail, Bithynia tentaculata, is an invasive snail that facilitates outbreaks of waterfowl disease in the Upper Mississippi River of the United States. In response, there is interest in identifying strategies that mitigate its population and spread. In this study we assessed the effects of a copper (Cu) molluscicide, EarthTec® QZ, at three concentrations (0, 0.1 and 0.6 mg/L Cu) on adult B. tentaculata and a coexisting native species, Physa gyrina. We found that in the 0.6 mg/L Cu treatment, ~ 68% of B. tentaculata snails remained alive after a 4-day exposure whereas all P. gyrina snails died. In contrast, a majority of both snail species remained alive and active after 4 days in the control and 0.1 mg/L Cu treatments. Although B. tentaculata demonstrated higher survivorship, it bioaccumulated more Cu than P. gyrina. Additionally, examination of B. tentaculata individuals revealed that females tended to exhibit higher mortality than males.