Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Social influence on anti-predatory behaviors of juvenile bighead carp (Hypophthalmichthys nobilis) are influenced by conspecific experience and shoal composition.

Abstract

At early life stages invasive fishes may have no innate or learned behavioral responses to native predators. However, social cues expressed by shoal mates is one strategy species use to assess risk. By shoaling and using social cues, fishes may identify and mimic others with anti-predator behaviors to increase their own survival. Ability of non-native fishes, such as bighead carp (Hypophthalmichthys nobilis), to mimic native species that have experienced predatory threats is not known. In this experimental study, we varied the number of experienced individuals and the species composition to contrast the responses of naïve juvenile bighead carp exposed to predatory kairomones when grouped with differing numbers of either experienced conspecific or experienced heterospecific (golden shiner, Notemigonus crysoleucas) shoal mates. We found fully naïve groups of bighead carp did not respond to largemouth bass kairomones, but that naïve individuals could mimic anti-predatory behaviors of experienced individuals, even when those experienced individuals were heterospecifics. Diverse alarm responses of bighead carp to composition and experience suggest that responses of this species are plastic. Through changing responses based on shoal experience level and composition, plastic social learning highlights how naïve individuals may adapt to novel predator threats, which could inform predictions of non-native persistence in novel waterways.