Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Serological evidence of bartonellosis in an indigenous community in the Brazilian Legal Amazonia.

Abstract

Background: Due to immunological susceptibility, close contact with the environment and way of life, indigenous communities are in a highly vulnerable condition to be affected by zoonoses, such as bartonellosis. Methods: Seventy three paired serum samples were collected from indigenous people from a region of the Brazilian Legal Amazon, in cohorts carried out in 2014 and 2015, with the performance of serological tests by indirect immunofluorescence to detect anti-Bartonella IgG antibodies. The interviews and laboratory results were double entered in the EpiInfo 7 software, and the data processing was performed in the MiniTab 17 software. Results: 5.47% of the indigenous people were seroreagent. The female gender was predominant (65.75%), aged between 20 and 39 years old (39.73%) with complete elementary school (42.47%). As for housing, wooden residences predominated (50.68%). Rodents were seen by 46.58% of the interviewees, and 55.88% of them reported that the animal was close to or inside the house. It was identified that each indigenous family, in its majority, had four to six cats, for the function of hunters of rodents. Conclusion: The high concentration of domestic cats, the close contact of indigenous people with wild rodents and the lack of care and poor hygiene of both are aspects that imply the possibility of infection by Bartonella sp. Health surveillance through seroepidemiological studies is essential to find evidence of the circulation of bartonellosis in these populations.