Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

The allelopathic potential of Rosa blanda Aiton on selected wild-growing native and cultivated plants in Europe.

Abstract

Invasive plant species are responsible for changing colonized ecosystems by occupying new areas and creating a threat to the functioning of the native flora and fauna populations. Alien plants can produce allelochemicals, substances completely new to indigenous communities. This study investigated the germination seed reactions of Festuca rubra L. and Raphanus sativus L. var. radicula Pers. cv. Rowa on the extracts from the roots, stalks, leaves, and flowers of Rosa blanda. Aqueous extracts at concentrations of 1%, 2.5%, and 5% were used in order to determine the allelopathic potential of this alien rose for Europe. With the increase in the concentration of extracts, a decrease in the germination capacity of seeds of the tested species was observed. R. blanda extracts inhibited the growth of seedlings. Depending on the concentration and type of the extract, changes in biomass and water content in Red Fescue and Red Radish seedlings were also shown. The highest differences in the electrolyte leakages were noted in seedlings treated with 5% rose extracts. The study showed that the aqueous extracts of R. blanda leaves and flowers had the greatest allelopathic potential.