Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Selective herbicide control: using furrows and carbon seed coatings to establish a native bunchgrass while reducing cheatgrass cover.

Abstract

Invasion by exotic grasses is degrading dryland ecosystems worldwide and efforts to restore native vegetation in invaded areas have been largely unsuccessful. Control of invasive grasses with herbicide also limits restoration efforts using native seed. In this study, we evaluated two approaches that could allow for the restoration of a native species Pseudoroegneria spicata while reducing an invasive annual grass Bromus tectorum with a herbicide mixture in the sagebrush steppe ecosystem (the United States). We used two methods to protect native seeds from herbicide: activated carbon was applied as a seed coating with the intent of absorbing the herbicide around the seed, and furrows were used to side-sweep soil sprayed with herbicide away from the planted seed. Our results indicate that imazapic + glyphosate herbicide application had a strong negative effect on the invasive annual grass, reducing B. tectorum cover 91% after 1 year, and 39% after 2 years. Herbicide also had strong negative effects on P. spicata without a carbon-coating or furrow treatment, reducing seedling emergence 38%, 2-year plant density 65%, and 2-year total growth 90%. Both activated carbon seed coatings and furrow treatments limited herbicide effects on P. spicata 2-year growth, but neither treatment alone mitigated herbicide effects on all life stages. Combining carbon coatings and furrow treatments mitigated harmful herbicide effects on several plant stages (seedling emergence, plant densities, and growth). Our results suggest that combining activated carbon coatings and furrow results in similar establishment of a native perennial as a non-herbicide seeding and lowers B. tectorum abundance.