Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Comparison between invasive and non-invasive Streptococcus agalactiae isolates from human adults, based on virulence gene profiles, capsular genotypes, sequence types, and antimicrobial resistance patterns.

Abstract

This study assessed whether invasive group B Streptococcus (GBS) isolates were similar to non-invasive isolates from adult patients. Invasive and non-invasive GBS isolates were collected from three hospitals and two laboratory centers between January 2015 and October 2019. The isolates were identified by 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing and amplification of the GBS-specific dltS gene. The virulence gene profiles, capsular genotypes, sequence types (STs)/clonal complexes (CCs), and antimicrobial resistance (AMR) phenotypes/genotypes were determined for the 72 invasive and 50 non-invasive isolates that were comparatively analyzed. We observed a significantly decreased rate of rib detection in the invasive isolates compared to that in the non-invasive isolates (77.8% vs. 92.0%, P < 0.05). Additionally, we found significant differences in the prevalence of CC1 (23.6% vs. 46.0%, P < 0.05) and CC26 (12.5% vs. 2.0%, P < 0.05) between invasive and non-invasive populations. However, there were no significant differences in the comparative data of the virulence gene profiles, capsular genotypes, other STs/CCs, and AMR phenotypes/genotypes between the two populations. These findings suggest that both invasive and non-invasive isolates share similar features in terms of virulence gene profile, capsular genotype, ST/CC, and AMR genotype/phenotype (except for the rates of rib detection and CC1/CC26 prevalence).