Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Growth inhibition of Spodoptera frugiperda larvae by camptothecin correlates with alteration of the structures and gene expression profiles of the midgut.

Abstract

Background: Spodoptera frugiperda is a serious pest that causes devastating losses to many major crops, including corn, rice, sugarcane, and peanut. Camptothecin (CPT) is a bioactive secondary metabolite of the woody plant Camptotheca acuminata, which has shown high toxicity to various pests. However, the effect of CPT against S. frugiperda remains unknown. Results: In this study, bioassays have been conducted on the growth inhibition of CPT on S. frugiperda larvae. Histological and cytological changes were examined in the midgut of larvae fed on an artificial diet supplemented with 1.0 and 5.0 µg/g CPT. The potential molecular mechanism was explored by comparative transcriptomic analyses among midgut samples obtained from larvae under different treatments. A total of 915 and 3560 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified from samples treated with 1.0 and 5.0 µg/g CPT, respectively. Among the identified genes were those encoding detoxification-related proteins and components of peritrophic membrane such as mucins and cuticle proteins. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway enrichment analyses indicated that part of DEGs were involved in DNA replication, digestion, immunity, endocrine system, and metabolism. Conclusions: Our results provide useful information on the molecular basis for the impact of CPT on S. frugiperda and for future studies on potential practical application.