Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Adaptation of Amorpha fruticosa to different habitats is enabled by photosynthetic apparatus plasticity.

Abstract

The rapid growth and spreading of invasive plant species could be related to their efficient photosynthesis performance. We analysed and compared photosynthetic efficiency of invasive indigo bush (Amorpha fruticosa L.) and noninvasive native Quercus robur L., Alnus glutinosa L., Populus alba L., and Cornus sanguinea L. with the overlapping distribution. The study was performed at two lowland areas at the beginning of the vegetation season (May) and during the flowering period (July). At both study sites, indigo bush showed better photosynthetic performance than native plants. Negative L- and K-bands in indigo bush indicated faster electron transport and better connectivity within the PSII units. Additionally, the highest performance and structure-function indexes suggested efficient utilization of absorbed light energy in indigo bush. Our results suggested that remarkable plasticity of photosynthetic reactions in indigo bush enabled them more efficient capture and utilization of light energy what might be important factors contributing to the invasiveness of this alien species.