Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Evaluation of management factors affecting the relative success of a brook trout eradication program using YY male fish and electrofishing suppression.

Abstract

Removal of non-native fish populations can be crucial to the conservation of native species, but often presents a complex challenge for managers. The goal of Trojan Y chromosome (TYC) programs is to skew the non-native sex ratio until only males remain, leading to eradication. We present results from a simulation model used to explore effects of alternative management approaches on an in-progress mechanical removal and TYC program to eradicate non-native brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis). Simulation results indicated that stocking fingerling YY males (~137 mm) was more effective than stocking catchable-sized YY males (~230 mm), although questions about intercohort competition warrant further investigation. Increasing the proportion of mature fingerling YY males reduced treatment time by increasing the number of YY male spawners and increasing density-dependent mortality on young, mature wild brook trout. Maximizing the spatial distribution of YY male releases may be crucial to program success but is also dependent upon immediate dispersal movements. Principles derived from our results can be broadly applied to the management of other aquatic invaded systems using TYC programs to eradicate non-native species.