Invasive Species Compendium

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Abstract

Tick bite frequency, prevention practices and Lyme disease diagnoses among U.S. Hispanic survey respondents.

Abstract

Tick bite prevention practices, knowledge of Lyme disease (LD) symptoms and transmission, and patterns of LD diagnoses among Hispanic persons have been reported but not comprehensively evaluated. In 2014, CDC examined questions from a prospective nationwide survey of U.S. Hispanic adults conducted via the Offerwise QueOpinas panel regarding ticks and LD. From October to November, a total of 2,649 surveys were released and 1,006 completed surveys returned. Overall, 44% of respondents reported routinely practising at least one form of personal protection against tick bites, and wearing repellent was the most commonly reported method (29%). Approximately 6% of respondents reported a tick bite for either themselves or someone in their household during the previous 12 months. An individual or household diagnosis of LD in the previous year was reported by 2% of respondents, with the highest proportion of diagnoses reported by respondents from high LD incidence states. The annual incidence of healthcare provider-diagnosed LD in the survey population was higher than national surveillance estimates for reported LD among U.S. Hispanic persons during 2000-2013. As annual incidence of LD continues to increase, it is important to ensure equitable access to information about LD, including disease transmission, manifestations, and prevention recommendations. Results from this survey can help inform public health outreach focused on effective tick bite prevention methods and early recognition of LD.