Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Ac106/107 affects production of infectious progeny BV by regulating transcription of late viral genes and host cell energy metabolism.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: AcMNPV is a model organism of baculovirus, and Spodoptera frugiperda is one of its hosts. Disclosing the role of ac106/107 in AcMNPV infecting Spodoptera frugiperda 9 (Sf9) cells is of great significance for modifying AcMNPV as a microbial insecticide. This work constructed recombinant baculovirus that knocking out, repairment and overexpression of ac106/107 and explored the effects of Ac106/107 on the proliferation of progeny viruses. Moreover, the potential mechanism and targets of ac106/107 were further revealed. RESULTS: First, compared with the Bacmid-EGFP transfection group, the progeny virus does not proliferate after knocking out of ac106/107, and the proliferation ability increases by 14.5% at 72 h post transfection (h p.t.) when overexpression of ac106/107. However, knockout, repairment and overexpression of ac106/107 have no effect on viral DNA replication. Secondly, Ac106/107-EGFP was located in the cytoplasm and nucleus. Transcription level of late viral genes and viral RNA polymerase subunit genes in the Bacmidac106/107KO-EGFP transfection group and Bacmid-Ac106/107-EGFP transfection group was reduced and increased, respectively. Thirdly, AcMNPV would increase the glucose utilization and lactate consumption of the host Sf9 cells, and Bacmidac106/107KO-EGFP transfection group had lower glucose consumption and lactic acid accumulation than Bacmid-EGFP, Bacmidac106/107KO -Ac106/107(rep)-EGFP and Bacmid-Ac106/107-EGFP transfection groups. CONCLUSION: Ac106/107 can enter the nucleus and affect transcription of viral RNA polymerase subunit genes, which in turn affects the transcription of late genes, and ultimately affects virus proliferation and energy metabolism in host cells.