Invasive Species Compendium

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Abstract

Genetic relationship and parentages of historical peaches revealed by microsatellite markers.

Abstract

Pedigrees of most historical peach cultivars in the USA, including the widely known peach 'Elberta', are poorly documented or speculative, as are their phylogenetic relationships. Co-dominant microsatellite markers are a reliable tool to decipher their genetic relationships and possible parentages. In this study, twenty amplification-reliable microsatellite markers were used for genotyping of forty-eight historical, foreign, or feral peach cultivars to study their genetic and parental relationships. Based on the phylogenetic tree built with the shared allele genetic distances, these materials were grouped into five clusters, which were consistent with their coordinated partitions generated by principal coordinate analysis. The genotyping results suggested that 'Early Crawford' was the unknown pollen parent of 'Elberta' rather than 'Oldmixon Free' or 'Late Crawford', two other proposed parents. The marker results also confirmed the reported pedigrees of 'Rio Oso Germ' as a self-pollination of 'Late Crawford' and 'Cumberland' as a hybrid of 'Georgia Belle' and 'Greensboro'. In addition, 'J. H. Hale' and 'Early Elberta' appeared to be OP outcrosses of 'Elberta', while 'Dwarf Elberta' appeared to be a bud sport of 'Elberta'. Some genotyped materials apparently were not the original historical cultivars, which would be a main impediment for conclusive inference of parentage relationship.