Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Prices of alien tree species timber against its harvest in Poland in years 2013-2018.

Abstract

The most common alien tree species in forests of Poland include black locust (Robinia pseudoacaccia), Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and northern red oak (Quercus robur). Despite rather small area and volume share of these species in total area and volume of Polish forests, their production potential (especially of Douglas fir), specific possibilities of wood utilisation (parquet or garden posts) and additional benefits (e.g. in bee-keeping), together with wide-spread suggestions pointing such tree species as beneficiaries of the observed climate changes, cause increased interest in the raw material of Douglas fir, black locust and northern red oak on the timber market. Also the analysis of the tendency to obtain, for example, Douglas fir indicates a quite likely increase in the role of these species in the future. The aim of the study is to analyse and characterise changes in wood prices of the investigated alien tree species growing in Poland and to investigate their relationship with the supply of such raw material in years 2013-2018. We used data about prices and harvest of medium- and large-sized Douglas fir, black locust and northern red oak timber available from the State Forests Information System. In the analysed period both timber prices and supply rose steadily but insignificantly (fig.). Compared to the mean annual price of wood sold by the State Forests National Forest Holding, the price of Douglas fir wood was slightly higher and amounted to 102-111%. In turn, the price of black locust wood was lower equalling to 88-94%, while the price of red oak amounted to 161-213% of the mean annual price of timber raw material. In the case of Douglas fir and black locust, the obtained prices did not significantly depend on the supply of raw material, both for medium- and large-sized wood, as well as without division into assortments (tab. 2). On the other hand, for northern red oak, we found this relationship to be significant for medium-sized wood as well as for the whole timber sales without distinguishing of the assortments (tab. 2).