Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Efficacy of two neonicotinoid insecticides against invasive wood borer Aromia bungii larvae in dietary toxicity test.

Abstract

In recent years, insecticide trunk injection was put into practical use for controlling wood boring pests. However, few studies have investigated the dose-response relationships between insecticides and wood-boring pests in detail. This study used two commercial formulations of the neonicotinoid insecticides thiamethoxam and dinotefuran and investigated their dose-response relationships with invasive wood borer Aromia bungii (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) larvae. Neonates and late instar larvae were reared with an artificial diet containing different insecticide concentrations (0.01-100 ppm) in the laboratory, and their diet excavation activity, survival rate, and weight change were recorded. Diet excavation immediately dropped in larvae exposed to high concentrations of thiamethoxam or dinotefuran (≥1 ppm in neonates and ≥10 ppm in late instar larvae). The weight and survival rate gradually declined over 12 weeks in late instar larvae. These results suggest that the two neonicotinoids intoxicate and debilitate A. bungii larvae gradually to death. In practical use, rapid suppression of A. bungii wood boring damage can be expected by trunk injection of neonicotinoid insecticides. However, a relatively long-term retention of the insecticides may be required to kill large larvae. Neonates may be controlled with lower insecticide dosage and shorter exposure than larger larvae.