Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Abstract

Caryophyllidean tapeworms (Cestoda), nearctic parasites of fish in Mexico, including description of a new species of Isoglaridacris and the first report of Khawia japonensis, an invasive parasite of common carp (Cyprinus carpio).

Abstract

The first survey of caryophyllidean tapeworms parasitising catostomid and cyprinid fish in Mexico is provided, including new host and geographical records. Isoglaridacris brevicollis n. sp. is described from the Nazas sucker, Catostomus nebuliferus Garman (type host), in Durango, C. bernardini Girard in Sonora, and Moxostoma austrinum Bean (Cypriniformes: Catostomidae) in Jalisco. The new species differs from congeners mainly in the shape of the scolex, which is rounded, and by the absence of a defined neck (distinct, often long in other congeners). Pseudoglaridacris confusa found in Ictiobus meridionalis (also a member of the family Catostomidae) from Oaxaca and Veracruz represents the southern-most report of species of this Nearctic genus. Three morphotypes of the Holarctic Archigetes Leuckart, 1878 were found in two leuciscid fishes (Notropis caliensis and N. nazas) and in silverside Chirostoma sp. (Atherinidae). It is the first record of any caryophyllidean in atheriniform fish. The first record of Khawia japonensis (Yamaguti, 1934) (syn. K. iowensis Calentine et Ulmer, 1961), a parasite of common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.), in Mexico represents another evidence of its invasive potential. The caryophyllidean fauna of Mexican freshwater fish is depauperate compared to that in the United States and Canada, which seems to be related to a much lower number of species of suckers (Catostomidae) occurring in Mexico, possibly also to the lower number of fish in the population.